Tuesday, October 14, 2008

Perfecting the omelet, Part 2: Almost

I'm getting there. The omelets on Sunday were an improvement from last week's. Since Murdo and I like our fillings more cooked than raw, I've decided that slightly cooking the fillings in butter beforehand is the way to go. I'm getting better at lifting the edges of the egg in the skillet and swishing the uncooked egg underneath, so as to avoid undercooked insides. When the egg is set, I add the fillings to half the skillet (the half opposite the handle). Then I attempt the slide-flip-fold method, which involves sliding half of the set omelet and fillings onto a plate and flipping the skillet over, thus folding the second half over the fillings.

Except that when the slide-flip-fold part came along, I panicked. I got scared that the egg would stick to the pan and and start tearing and the insides would spill over the edge like some sort of gory omelet explosion.

So I tried a different method: Fold the omelet while it's still in the skillet. Lesson learned: This method sucks. A heavy, overstuffed omelet is pretty tough to get out of the pan, at least for me. Lifting it with a spatula caused the ends to droop and bleed the goodies back into the pan. Sliding it out of the skillet caused the omelet to unfold upon reaching the plate. So I sort of lifted/slid the suckers out of the pan and ended up with lopsided omelets:

omelet
omelet with tomatoes

Again, tasty and satisfying. But not quite the perfect omelet I'm striving to achieve.

Getting there, though.

7 comments:

  1. The perfect omelet is all about size. I will never ever achieve the perfect omelet because i like too much stuff in mine. One key thing is a heavily greased commercial grade omelet skillet. Cook non-egg ingredients in the skillet until they reach appropriate done-ness. Add eggs. Don't touch!! Let it sit there and cook. When it is done on the bottom, run a spatula underneath to separate the omelet carefully from the skillet. You shouldn't have any problems if your skillet is properly greased. flip the omelet completely over and then when that side is done, which shouldn't take long, fold over and serve. works like a charm. =)

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  2. how do you flip the omelet completely over?? do you flip it onto a plate and then slide it back in the skillet?

    i'm the same way though, i like too much stuff in mine. i think i've got my method down now. Omelet Part 3 to follow shortly...

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  3. Oh my gosh, Jacqui, I had the exact same reaction to Ryan's comment. How do you flip it without spilling the insides of the not-cooked side??

    I've tried the fold method, too, BTW. Sucked for me, as well.

    p.s.--really annoying thing about my blog reader is that it's not picking up your site anymore. not sure what that's all about!?

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  4. If you watch professional omelet makers, usually dudes at higher end brunch places that make omelets to order, they will actually flip them like a pancake... true skillz. i usually just use the biggest spatula i have and if it is cooked enough and the pan is greasy enough you should be alright when you flip it over. Remember, it's much much easier to do when the omelets are small. two egg maximum!

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  5. the "not cooked side" should be pretty cooked. try covering your skillet and you might not even need to flip it. :D

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  6. OK, I apologize in advance for, apparently, taking over your comments here. Two things: 1) You're appearing in my reader now--did you do something? What a relief, however it happened. 2) @ Ryan: Really? The upside should be pretty cooked?? And if I cover the skillet I might not need to flip? Must. try. this.

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  7. shanna - i didn't do anything with the reader...weird, though!

    ryan - two eggs max?! have you seen how murdo eats? more like three eggs minimum...ha!

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